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Obverse of 1831 Large Cent - Newcomb 9     Reverse of 1831 Large Cent - Newcomb 9


1831 LARGE CENT - NEWCOMB 9

Rarity: Scarce

Variety Equivalents: Breen 1849

Images courtesy of John D. Wright

Recent appearances:

PCGS graded AU-55 and Del Bland graded EF-40.  Ex - Ira & Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Inc.'s "Benson Collection, Part I", February 16, 18-20, 2001, lot 468, illustrated, where it was described as follows: "Large letters. Newcomb-9, Low Rarity-3Ten points sharper but there are several handling marks on both sides, mostly on the obverse, including a few on the face. Golden tan faded from mint color and well struck. The handling marks are visible with a glass, but the color and appeal of this piece is very high, and we expect a strong price when this one crosses the block. Ex: Ira S. Reed 1/5/45 at $5.50.", sold for $287.00

Del Bland graded AU-50.  Ex - Ira & Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Inc.'s "Benson Collection, Part I", February 16, 18-20, 2001, lot 469, illustrated, where it was described as follows: "Large letters. Newcomb-9, Low Rarity-3…Mint reddish brown surfaces, somewhat lustrous with small, darkish olive toning spots covering the right half of the reverse. A glass discloses some minute abrasions mostly near star ten and between M and E in AMERICA. Very attractive.", sold for $414.00

Notes:
Wright knew of two one-sided Proofs in 1992, including the one in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.  Breen (1988) listed only a single, one-sided Proof (that being the Miller-Ryder example), which may be the second example to which Wright referred.

This was the only use of the obverse die.

The reverse die of this variety was also used on 1831 Newcomb 6 and 1831 Newcomb 12.

Sources and/or recommended reading:
"The Cent Book 1816-1839" by John D. Wright

"Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" by Walter Breen

Relevant collector organizations:
Early American Coppers Club