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Obverse of 1995-W $50 Gold "American Eagle"     Reverse of 1995-W $50 Gold "American Eagle"


UNITED STATES "AMERICAN EAGLE" BULLION COINS - 1986-DATE

Notes:
In 1986, the United States began striking gold and silver bullion coins to compete with world bullion coins such as the Canadian Maple Leaf, the South African Krugerrand, and others.  The value of these coins was intended to be tied directly to their metal value, although in some cases (where mintages were low) a collector market has developed.  The bullion value of these coins far outstrips their face value.

Known as "American Eagles" because of the family of eagles on the reverse, U.S. silver bullion coins are available in Uncirculated and Proof versions, as well as in a number of different sets.  Proof coins may be ordered by the general public directly from the Mint.  Uncirculated coins are distributed by selected representatives, who then make them available to the secondary market.

The obverse of the U.S. silver bullion coins follows the artistic design created by Adolphe A. Weinman for the Half Dollars issued from 1916-1947, inclusive.  John Mercanti created the reverse design.

Each Silver Eagle has a face value of $1 and contains exactly one ounce of pure silver in an alloy of 99.93% silver and .07% copper.

A limited number of Mint State 2004 Silver Eagles were encapsulated by the Professional Coin Grading Service along with an insert signed by former NASA astronaut, Kathryn D. Sullivan.  A portion of the proceeds was dedicated to a science museum located in Ohio.

In 1997, the United States began striking platinum coins to compete with other world bullion coins.  U.S. platinum bullion coins are available in Uncirculated and Proof versions in four denominations: $10, $25, $50, and $100. The true value of these coins is tied directly to their intrinsic metal value, although in a few cases (where mintages are low) collectors will pay a significant premium over the bullion value.  Generally, however, the bullion value of these coins far outstrips their face value.

Proof coins may be ordered by the general public directly from the Mint, either as single coins or as a complete set of the four different denominations.  Uncirculated coins are distributed by selected representatives, who then make them available to the secondary market based on the prevailing bullion value of platinum.

John M. Mercanti designed the obverse of the U.S. platinum bullion coins using the head of the Statue of Liberty.  In keeping with the Mint's "American Eagles" theme, new reverses are developed each year - always with an eagle incorporated into the design.

The metal content of each denomination consists of 99.95% pure platinum.

Mintmarks appear on the reverse, but positions vary from year to year.  U.S. platinum bullion coins have been struck at the following mints:
Philadelphia 
West Point

BEWARE - Counterfeit examples of the 2002 1/10 ounce platinum coins began being offered in 2003.

Images courtesy of Global Certification Services

American Eagle Silver Bullion Coins (1986-Date) 
American Eagle Gold Bullion Coins (1986-Date)
American Eagle Platinum Bullion Coins (1997-Date)